'I call it the blame and shame disease' : A qualitative study about perceptions of social stigma surrounding type 2 diabetes

Journal article


Browne, Jessica L., Ventura, Adriana, Mosely, Kylie and Speight, Jane. (2013). 'I call it the blame and shame disease' : A qualitative study about perceptions of social stigma surrounding type 2 diabetes. BMJ Open. 3(11), p. Article e003384. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003384
AuthorsBrowne, Jessica L., Ventura, Adriana, Mosely, Kylie and Speight, Jane
Abstract

Objectives While health-related stigma has been the subject of considerable research in other conditions (obesity and HIV/AIDS), it has not received substantial attention in diabetes. The aim of the current study was to explore the social experiences of Australian adults living with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), with a particular focus on the perception and experience of diabetes-related stigma.

Design A qualitative study using semistructured interviews, which were audio recorded, transcribed and subject to thematic analysis.

Setting This study was conducted in non-clinical settings in metropolitan and regional areas in the Australian state of Victoria. Participants were recruited primarily through the state consumer organisation representing people with diabetes.

Participants All adults aged ≥18 years with T2DM living in Victoria were eligible to take part. Twenty-five adults with T2DM participated (12 women; median age 61 years; median diabetes duration 5 years).

Results A total of 21 (84%) participants indicated that they believed T2DM was stigmatised, or reported evidence of stigmatisation. Specific themes about the experience of stigma were feeling blamed by others for causing their own condition, being subject to negative stereotyping, being discriminated against or having restricted opportunities in life. Other themes focused on sources of stigma, which included the media, healthcare professionals, friends, family and colleagues. Themes relating to the consequences of this stigma were also evident, including participants’ unwillingness to disclose their condition to others and psychological distress. Participants believed that people with type 1 diabetes do not experience similar stigmatisation.

Conclusions Our study found evidence of people with T2DM experiencing and perceiving diabetes-related social stigma. Further research is needed to explore ways to measure and minimise diabetes-related stigma at the individual and societal levels, and also to explore perceptions and experiences of stigma in people with type 1 diabetes.

Year2013
JournalBMJ Open
Journal citation3 (11), p. Article e003384
PublisherBMJ Publishing Group
ISSN2044-6055
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003384
PubMed ID24247325
Scopus EID2-s2.0-84888121455
PubMed Central IDPMC3840338
Open accessPublished as ‘gold’ (paid) open access
Page range1-10
FunderDiabetes Australia
Deakin University
Publisher's version
License
File Access Level
Open
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online18 Nov 2013
Publication process dates
Accepted18 Oct 2013
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