Low-Load very high-repetition resistance training attenuates bone loss at the lumbar spine in active post-menopausal women

Journal article


Nicholson, Vaughan Patrick, McKean, Mark R., Slater, Gary J., Kerr, Ava and Burkett, Brendan J. 2015. Low-Load very high-repetition resistance training attenuates bone loss at the lumbar spine in active post-menopausal women. Calcified Tissue International. 96 (96), pp. 490 - 499. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00223-015-9976-6
AuthorsNicholson, Vaughan Patrick, McKean, Mark R., Slater, Gary J., Kerr, Ava and Burkett, Brendan J.
Abstract

This study determined the effect of 6 months of low-load very high-repetition resistance training on bone mineral density ( BMD ) and body composition in nonosteoporotic middle-aged and older women. Fifty healthy, active community-dwelling women aged 56–75 years took part in the two-group, repeated-measures randomized controlled trial. Participants either undertook 6 months of low-load very high-repetition resistance training in the form of BodyPump™ or served as control participants. Outcome measures included BMD at the lumbar spine, hip, and total body; total fat mass; fat-free soft tissue mass and maximal isotonic strength. Significant group-by-time interactions were found for lumbar spine BMD and maximal strength in favor of the BodyPump™ group. No favorable effects were found for hip BMD, total body BMD, total fat mass, or fat-free soft tissue mass. Three participants withdrew from the intervention group due to injury or fear of injury associated with training. Under the conditions used in this research, low-load very high-repetition resistance training is effective at attenuating losses in lumbar spine BMD compared to controls in healthy, active women aged over 55 years but did not influence hip and total body BMD or fat mass and fat-free soft tissue mass.

Keywordsbone mass; exercise; strength; middle-age; elderly
Year2015
JournalCalcified Tissue International
Journal citation96 (96), pp. 490 - 499
PublisherSpringer Verlag
ISSN0171-967X
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1007/s00223-015-9976-6
Scopus EID2-s2.0-84929707121
Page range490 - 499
Research GroupSchool of Allied Health
Place of publicationGermany
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