Lay conceptions of mental disorder: The folk psychiatry model

Journal article


Haslam, Nick, Ban, Lauren and Kaufmann, Leah Mary 2007. Lay conceptions of mental disorder: The folk psychiatry model. Australian Psychologist. 42 (2), pp. 129 - 137. https://doi.org/10.1080/00050060701280615
AuthorsHaslam, Nick, Ban, Lauren and Kaufmann, Leah Mary
Abstract

This article presents a theoretical model of laypeople's conceptions of mental disorder that is intended to serve as a basis for research and practice. This “folk psychiatry” model proposes that mental disorders, and other forms of psychological deviancy, are understood in terms of four underlying dimensions. Each dimension has a distinct cognitive underpinning, which is grounded in recent social psychological research and theory. Research evidence supporting the model is laid out, and implications of the model for public attitudes towards people suffering from mental disorders are discussed. The model offers a number of conceptual and practical advantages in an area where psychological theory has often been lacking.

Year2007
JournalAustralian Psychologist
Journal citation42 (2), pp. 129 - 137
PublisherAustralian Psychological Society
ISSN0005-0067
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1080/00050060701280615
Page range129 - 137
Research GroupSchool of Philosophy
Place of publicationAustralia
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https://acuresearchbank.acu.edu.au/item/87v7v/lay-conceptions-of-mental-disorder-the-folk-psychiatry-model

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