Benchmarking and learning in public healthcare: Properties and effects

Journal article


Buckmaster, Natalie and Mouritsen, Jan. (2017). Benchmarking and learning in public healthcare: Properties and effects. Australian Accounting Review. 27(3), pp. 232 - 247. https://doi.org/10.1111/auar.12134
AuthorsBuckmaster, Natalie and Mouritsen, Jan
Abstract

This research investigates the effects of learningā€oriented benchmarking in public healthcare settings. Benchmarking is a widely adopted yet little explored accounting practice that is part of the paradigm of New Public Management. Extant studies are directed towards mandated coercive benchmarking applications. The present study analyses voluntary benchmarking in a public setting that is oriented towards learning. The study contributes by showing how benchmarking can be mobilised for learning and offers evidence of the effects of such benchmarking for performance outcomes. It concludes that benchmarking can enable learning in public settings but that this requires actors to invest in ensuring that benchmark data are directed towards improvement.

Year2017
JournalAustralian Accounting Review
Journal citation27 (3), pp. 232 - 247
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons
ISSN1835-2561
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1111/auar.12134
Scopus EID2-s2.0-85009959859
Page range232 - 247
Research GroupPeter Faber Business School
Publisher's version
File Access Level
Controlled
Place of publicationAustralia
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https://acuresearchbank.acu.edu.au/item/88zww/benchmarking-and-learning-in-public-healthcare-properties-and-effects

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