Role-play and student engagement: Reflections from the classroom

Journal article


Stevens, Rachel. (2015) Role-play and student engagement: Reflections from the classroom. Teaching in Higher Education. 20(5), pp. 481 - 492. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2015.1020778
AuthorsStevens, Rachel
Abstract

Role-play is viewed by scholars as an effective active learning strategy: it encourages participation among passive learners, adds dynamism to the classroom and promotes the retention of material. But what do students think of role-play? This study surveyed 144 students after a role-play activity in a history course and asked them to identify what they gained from the activity and if it encouraged them to learn more about the topic. The results found conflicting student views: though a large majority found the activity beneficial, a small minority gained little from the exercise. It is argued that role-play can be counterproductive for weak and/or unprepared students. Role-play may be a popular teaching method but teachers should consider how format and preparation can impact learning outcomes.

Keywordsactive learning; history; oral history; role-play
Year2015
JournalTeaching in Higher Education
Journal citation20 (5), pp. 481 - 492
PublisherRoutledge
ISSN1356-2517
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2015.1020778
Scopus EID2-s2.0-84930091144
Page range481 - 492
Research GroupInstitute for Humanities and Social Sciences
Publisher's version
File Access Level
Controlled
Place of publicationUnited Kingdom
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https://acuresearchbank.acu.edu.au/item/8q229/role-play-and-student-engagement-reflections-from-the-classroom

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