How much does intellectual disability really cost? First estimates for Australia

Journal article


Doran, Christopher M., Einfeld, Stewart L., Madden, Rosamond H., Otim, Michael Ekubu, Horstead, Sian K., Ellis, Louise A. and Emerson, Eric. (2012) How much does intellectual disability really cost? First estimates for Australia. Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability. 37(1), pp. 42 - 49. https://doi.org/10.3109/13668250.2011.648609
AuthorsDoran, Christopher M., Einfeld, Stewart L., Madden, Rosamond H., Otim, Michael Ekubu, Horstead, Sian K., Ellis, Louise A. and Emerson, Eric
Abstract

Background: Given the paucity of relevant data, this study estimates the cost of intellectual disability (ID) to families and the government in Australia. Method: Family costs were collected via the Client Service Receipt Inventory, recording information relating to service use and personal expense as a consequence of ID. Government expenditure on the provision of support and services was estimated using top-down costing. Results: A total of 109 parents participated. The cost of ID in Australia is high, especially for families. Total economic costs of ID are close to $14,720 billion annually. Opportunity cost of lost time provided 85% of family expense. A comparison of family expense and social welfare benefits received suggests that families suffer considerable loss. This may impact on families’ physical and emotional wellbeing. Conclusions: Monitoring of changes in expenditure is required. Policies should ensure that money devoted to ID is allocated in a rational, equitable, and cost-effective manner.

Keywordscost; intellectual disability; families
Year2012
JournalJournal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability
Journal citation37 (1), pp. 42 - 49
PublisherRoutledge
ISSN1366-8250
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.3109/13668250.2011.648609
Page range42 - 49
Research GroupSchool of Allied Health
Publisher's version
File Access Level
Controlled
Place of publicationUnited Kingdom
EditorsM. Arthur-Kelly
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