Energy utilisation and postprandial responses during sitting interrupted by regular activity breaks

Journal article


Donaldson, Caitlin I., Haszard, Jillian J., Perry, Tracy L., Homer, Ashleigh R., Fenemor, Stephen P., Rehrer, Nancy J. and Peddie, Meredith C.. (2020). Energy utilisation and postprandial responses during sitting interrupted by regular activity breaks. Journal of Sports Sciences. 38(22), pp. 2517-2524. https://doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2020.1792190
AuthorsDonaldson, Caitlin I., Haszard, Jillian J., Perry, Tracy L., Homer, Ashleigh R., Fenemor, Stephen P., Rehrer, Nancy J. and Peddie, Meredith C.
Abstract

Interrupting sedentary behaviour with regular activity breaks benefits glycaemic control; however, the influence of the energy utilised during these activity breaks on postprandial metabolic response is relatively unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the energy utilisation of regular (every 30 min) short (1 min 40 s or 2 min) activity breaks was associated with the lowering of postprandial glycaemia, insulinemia and lipidemia.

Using separate data from two previously performed studies (ALPhA Study n = 65, age 25.7 (5.2) y, 40% male, BMI 23.6 (4.1) kg · m−2. ABPA study n = 35, age 25.1 (3.7) y, 31% male, BMI 23.4 (3.2) kg · m−2) we investigated the association between energy utilisation (measured by indirect calorimetry) and postprandial glucose, insulin and triglycerides during prolonged sitting, and regular activity breaks.Results

Mixed effects regression models indicated that energy utilisation was not consistently associated with postprandial glucose, insulin or triglyceride responses (p > 0.05 for all). Additionally, there was some indication that energy utilisation was obscuring (mildly suppressing) the effects of regular activity breaks on glucose, insulin and triglyceride iAUC.Conclusions

If energy utilisation does not mediate the association between regular activity breaks and postprandial glycaemic response, it is possible that it is the frequency of the activity breaks that is beneficial.

Keywordssedentary behaviour; sitting; exercise; blood glucose; insulin; triglycerides
Year2020
JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
Journal citation38 (22), pp. 2517-2524
PublisherRoutledge
ISSN0264-0414
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2020.1792190
Scopus EID2-s2.0-85087813822
Research or scholarlyResearch
Page range2517-2524
Publisher's version
License
All rights reserved
File Access Level
Controlled
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online10 Jul 2020
Publication process dates
Accepted27 Jun 2020
Deposited03 Jul 2021
Permalink -

https://acuresearchbank.acu.edu.au/item/8w4z5/energy-utilisation-and-postprandial-responses-during-sitting-interrupted-by-regular-activity-breaks

Restricted files

Publisher's version

  • 56
    total views
  • 0
    total downloads
  • 2
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month
These values are for the period from 19th October 2020, when this repository was created.

Export as

Related outputs

Frequency of interruptions to sitting time : Benefits for postprandial metabolism in type 2 diabetes
Homer, Ashleigh R., Taylor, Frances C., Dempsey, Paddy C., Wheeler, Michael J., Sethi, Parneet, Townsend, Melanie K., Grace, Megan S., Green, Daniel J., Cohen, Neale D., Larsen, Robyn N., Kingwell, Bronwyn A., Owen, Neville and Dunstan, David W.. (2021). Frequency of interruptions to sitting time : Benefits for postprandial metabolism in type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care. 44(6), pp. 1-10. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc20-1410
Acute effects of interrupting prolonged sitting on vascular function in type 2 diabetes
Dunstan, D., Homer, A., Wheeler, M. and Maniar, N.. (2021). Acute effects of interrupting prolonged sitting on vascular function in type 2 diabetes. American Journal of Physiology: Heart and Circulatory Physiology. 320(1), pp. H393-H403. https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpheart.00422.2020
Car use and cardiovascular disease risk : Systematic review and implications for transport research
Sugiyama, Takemi, Chandrabose, M., Homer, A., Sugiyama, Masaaki, Dunstan, D. and Owen, Neville. (2020). Car use and cardiovascular disease risk : Systematic review and implications for transport research. Journal of Transport and Health. 19, p. 100930. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jth.2020.100930
Too much sitting and dysglycemia: Mechanistic links and implications for obesity
Homer, Ashleigh, Owen, Neville and Dunstan, David. (2018). Too much sitting and dysglycemia: Mechanistic links and implications for obesity. Current Opinion in Endocrine and Metabolic Research. 4, pp. 42 - 49. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.coemr.2018.09.003