Using the importance for survival scale to identify preferred nature scenes with restorative potential : A qualitative study

Journal article


Thake, Carol L., Bambling, Matthew, Edirippulige, Sisira and Marx, Eric. (2020) Using the importance for survival scale to identify preferred nature scenes with restorative potential : A qualitative study. Health Environments Research and Design Journal. 13(4), pp. 173-189. https://doi.org/10.1177/1937586720910082
AuthorsThake, Carol L., Bambling, Matthew, Edirippulige, Sisira and Marx, Eric
Abstract

Background:
Evidence supports the use of images of nature scenes in healthcare settings to reduce stress and improve emotional well-being. However, the literature is diverse and provides no integrated system to identify nature scenes that provide most therapeutic benefit.

Objective:
The current study aimed to validate and extend results of a correlational study that found the Importance for Survival Scale (IFSS) useful for selecting generally preferred nature scenes with therapeutic potential.

Methods:
The correlational study that tested the usefulness of the IFSS and the current qualitative study were components of a larger mixed-methods study. For the current study, general community participants (N = 20 males, 20 females; mean age = 48 years) provided verbal responses to questions about thoughts and feelings associated with a selection of photographs of nature scenes. Data were analyzed using a content analysis approach.

Results:
Themes and detailed descriptors associated with preference for, and emotional response to, most- and least-liked nature scenes were produced. A proportion of those themes is directly related to the construct of Importance for Survival (IFS), whereas other themes are better explained by alternative theoretical perspectives.

Conclusions:
Results uphold the IFSS as an effective tool for identifying generally preferred nature scenes with restorative potential, and provide information about the relative importance of IFSS subscales that may be used to further develop and refine the IFSS, as well as guide selection of restorative nature scenes. Results also provide fine-scaled descriptive information about preference for and emotional response to nature scenes.

Keywordsnature scenes; landscape images; access to nature; photographs; healthcare settings; scene preference; restoration from stress; emotional well-being; psycho-evolutionary theory
Year2020
JournalHealth Environments Research and Design Journal
Journal citation13 (4), pp. 173-189
PublisherSAGE Publications Inc.
ISSN1937-5867
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1177/1937586720910082
Scopus EID2-s2.0-85082430228
Research or scholarlyResearch
Page range173-189
Publisher's version
License
All rights reserved
File Access Level
Controlled
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online24 Mar 2020
Publication process dates
Deposited15 Jul 2021
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