Attributing error without taking a stand

Journal article


Perl, Caleb and Schroeder, Mark. (2019). Attributing error without taking a stand. Philosophical Studies: An International Journal for Philosophy in the Analytic Tradition. 176(6), pp. 1453-1471. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11098-019-01248-6
AuthorsPerl, Caleb and Schroeder, Mark
Abstract

Moral error theory is the doctrine that our first-order moral commitments are pervaded by systematic error. It has been objected that this makes the error theory itself a position in first-order moral theory that should be judged by the standards of competing first-order moral theories (Here we are thinking, for example, of Dworkin (Philos Public Aff 25(2):87–139, 1996) and Kramer (Moral realism as a moral doctrine. New York: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009). Kramer: “the objectivity of ethics is itself an ethical matter that rests primarily on ethical considerations. It is not something that can adequately be contested or confirmed through non-ethical reasoning” [2009, 1]). This paper shows that error theorists can resist this charge if they adopt a particular understanding of the presuppositions of moral discourse.

Keywordserror theory; presupposition; normative neutrality
Year2019
JournalPhilosophical Studies: An International Journal for Philosophy in the Analytic Tradition
Journal citation176 (6), pp. 1453-1471
PublisherSpringer
ISSN0031-8116
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1007/s11098-019-01248-6
Scopus EID2-s2.0-85060917874
Research or scholarlyResearch
Page range1453-1471
Publisher's version
License
All rights reserved
File Access Level
Controlled
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online06 Feb 2019
Publication process dates
Deposited02 Sep 2021
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