Can we know God? New insights from religious epistemology

Report


Climenhaga, Nevin. (2019). Can we know God? New insights from religious epistemology United States of America: John Templeton Foundation.
AuthorsClimenhaga, Nevin
Abstract

[Extract] This report reviews research supported by two recent Templeton research grants focused on religious epistemology. New Insights and Directions for Religious Epistemology, led by John Hawthorne, explores the implications of recent work in epistemology on questions in the epistemology of religion. Knowing in Religion and Morality, led by Michael Bergmann and Patrick Kain, focuses on skeptical challenges to moral and religious beliefs based on the presence of disagreement about moral and religious questions and the evolutionary origins of moral and religious beliefs.

Keywordsreligion; epistemology; morality; religious belief; rational belief; Christianity
Year2019
PublisherJohn Templeton Foundation
Place of publicationUnited States of America
Page range1-38
Web address (URL)https://www.templeton.org/religious-epistemology
https://www.templeton.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/Religious-Epistemology-PDF-Formatted.pdf
Publisher's version
License
All rights reserved
File Access Level
Controlled
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
OnlineSep 2019
Publication process dates
Deposited03 May 2022
Permalink -

https://acuresearchbank.acu.edu.au/item/8xw03/can-we-know-god-new-insights-from-religious-epistemology

Restricted files

Publisher's version

  • 2
    total views
  • 0
    total downloads
  • 2
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month
These values are for the period from 19th October 2020, when this repository was created.

Export as

Related outputs

A cumulative case argument for infallibilism
Climenhaga, Nevin. (2021). A cumulative case argument for infallibilism. In In Kyriacou, Christos and Wallbridge, Kevin (Ed.). Skeptical invariantism reconsidered pp. 57-79 Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780429353468-6
Causal Inference from Noise
Climenhaga, Nevin, DesAutels, Lane and Ramsey, Grant. (2021). Causal Inference from Noise. Noûs. 55(1), pp. 152-170. https://doi.org/10.1111/nous.12300
The structure of epistemic probabilities
Climenhaga, Nevin. (2020). The structure of epistemic probabilities. Philosophical Studies: An International Journal for Philosophy in the Analytic Tradition. 177(11), pp. 3213-3242. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11098-019-01367-0
Papias's prologue and the probability of parallels
Climenhaga, Nevin. (2020). Papias's prologue and the probability of parallels. Journal of Biblical Literature. 139(3), pp. 591-596. https://doi.org/10.15699/jbl.1393.2020.8
Infinite value and the best of all possible worlds
Climenhaga, Nevin. (2018). Infinite value and the best of all possible worlds. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research. 97(2), pp. 367 - 392. https://doi.org/10.1111/phpr.12383
Intuitions are used as evidence in philosophy
Climenhaga, Nevin. (2018). Intuitions are used as evidence in philosophy. Mind: A Quarterly review of philosophy. 127(505), pp. 69 - 104. https://doi.org/10.1093/mind/fzw032
How explanation guides confirmation
Climenhaga, Nevin. (2017). How explanation guides confirmation. Philosophy of Science: official journal of the Philosophy of Science Association. 84(2), pp. 359 - 368. https://doi.org/10.1086/690723
Inference to the best explanation made incoherent
Climenhaga, Nevin. (2017). Inference to the best explanation made incoherent. Journal of Philosophy. 114(5), pp. 251 - 273. https://doi.org/10.5840/jphil2017114519