Objectivism and subjectivism in epistemology

Book chapter


Littlejohn, Clayton. (2018). Objectivism and subjectivism in epistemology. In In Mitova, Veli (Ed.). The factive turn in epistemology pp. 142-160 Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316818992.009
AuthorsLittlejohn, Clayton
EditorsMitova, Veli
Abstract

[Extract] I will defend two objectivist views. The first is a view about epistemic norms. Objectivists about norms believe that some norms have objective application conditions (i.e., conditions that don’t supervene upon our non-factive mental states or the subjective aspects of our mental lives). The second is a view about epistemic justification. Objectivists about justification believe that justification depends upon whether certain objective conditions obtain. If, say, some objective condition is met and there’s a norm that says that you shouldn’t believe that it’s raining if this condition is met, you couldn’t justifiably believe that it’s raining because this condition is met. It might not seem that the condition is met. You might have evidence that leads you to think that you violate no norms, but

Page range142-160
Year2018
Book titleThe factive turn in epistemology
PublisherCambridge University Press
Place of publicationCambridge, United Kingdom
ISBN9781316818992
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316818992.009
Scopus EID2-s2.0-85048133440
Open accessPublished as green open access
Author's accepted manuscript
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All rights reserved
File Access Level
Open
Publisher's version
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All rights reserved
File Access Level
Controlled
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online26 Feb 2018
Publication process dates
Deposited10 Jun 2022
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