The influence of kinesiology tape colour on performance and corticomotor activity in healthy adults : A randomised crossover controlled trial

Journal article


Cavaleri, Rocco, Thapa, Tribikram, Beckenkamp, Paula R. and Chipchase, Lucinda S.. (2018). The influence of kinesiology tape colour on performance and corticomotor activity in healthy adults : A randomised crossover controlled trial. BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation. 10(1), p. Article 17. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13102-018-0106-4
AuthorsCavaleri, Rocco, Thapa, Tribikram, Beckenkamp, Paula R. and Chipchase, Lucinda S.
Abstract

Background
There exists conflicting evidence regarding the impact of kinesiology tape on performance and muscle function. One variable that may account for disparities in the findings of previous studies is the colour of the tape applied. Colour is hypothesised to influence sporting performance through modulation of arousal and aggression. However, few studies have investigated the influence of colour on products designed specifically to enhance athletic performance. Further, no studies have investigated the potential influence of colour on other drivers of performance, such as corticomotor activity and neuromuscular function. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the influence of kinesiology tape colour on athletic performance, knee extensor torque, and quadriceps neuromuscular function.

Methods
Thirty two healthy participants were assessed under five conditions, applied in random order: (1) no kinesiology tape (control), (2) beige-coloured kinesiology tape applied with tension (sham A), (3) beige-coloured kinesiology tape applied with no tension (sham B), (4) red-coloured kinesiology tape applied with tension, and (5) blue-coloured kinesiology tape applied with tension. Athletic performance was assessed using a previously validated hop test, knee extensor torque was measured using an isokinetic dynamometer, and transcranial magnetic stimulation was utilised to provide insight into the neuromuscular functioning of the quadriceps musculature.

Results
Kinesiology tape had no beneficial impact on lower limb performance or muscle strength in healthy adults. The colour of the tape did not influence athletic performance (F (4, 120) = 0.593, p = 0.669), quadriceps strength (F (4, 120) = 0.787, p = 0.536), or neuromuscular function (rectus femoris: F (2.661, 79.827) = 1.237, p = 0.301).

Conclusion
This study found that kinesiology tape does not alter lower limb performance or muscle function in healthy adults, irrespective of the colour of the tape applied. Future research should seek to confirm these findings beyond the research setting, across a range of sports, and at a range of skill levels.

Trial registration
Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry. ACTRN12616001506482. Prospectively registered on 01/11/2016.

Keywordskinesiology tape; colour; performance; corticomotor activity; transcranial magnetic stimulation
Year2018
JournalBMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
Journal citation10 (1), p. Article 17
PublisherBiomed Central Ltd
ISSN2052-1847
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1186/s13102-018-0106-4
PubMed ID30410769
Scopus EID2-s2.0-85065613665
PubMed Central IDPMC6211494
Open accessPublished as ‘gold’ (paid) open access
Research or scholarlyResearch
Page range1-8
FunderWestern Sydney University
Australian Postgraduate Award, Australian Goverment
Publisher's version
License
File Access Level
Open
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online01 Nov 2018
Publication process dates
Accepted18 Oct 2018
Deposited19 Aug 2022
Permalink -

https://acuresearchbank.acu.edu.au/item/8y223/the-influence-of-kinesiology-tape-colour-on-performance-and-corticomotor-activity-in-healthy-adults-a-randomised-crossover-controlled-trial

Download files


Publisher's version
OA_Cavaleri_2018_The_influence_of_kinesiology_tape_colour.pdf
License: CC BY 4.0
File access level: Open

  • 5
    total views
  • 0
    total downloads
  • 1
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month
These values are for the period from 19th October 2020, when this repository was created.

Export as

Related outputs

Neural multimodal integration underlying synchronization with a co-performer in music : Influences of motor expertise and visual information
Timmers, Renee, MacRitchie, Jennifer, Schabrun, Siobhan M., Thapa, Tribikram, Varlet, Manuel and Keller, Peter E.. (2020). Neural multimodal integration underlying synchronization with a co-performer in music : Influences of motor expertise and visual information. Neuroscience Letters. 721, p. Article 134803. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neulet.2020.134803
Cerebral peak alpha frequency reflects average pain severity in a human model of sustained, musculoskeletal pain
Furman, Andrew J., Thapa Rana, Tribikram, Summers, Simon J., Cavaleri, Rocco, Fogarty, Jack S., Steiner, Genevieve Z., Schabrun, Siobhan M. and Seminowicz, David A.. (2019). Cerebral peak alpha frequency reflects average pain severity in a human model of sustained, musculoskeletal pain. Journal of Neurophysiology. 122(4), pp. 1784-1793. https://doi.org/10.1152/jn.00279.2019
Corticomotor depression is associated with higher pain severity in the transition to sustained pain : A longitudinal exploratory study of individual differences
Seminowicz, David A., Thapa Rana, Tribikram and Schabrun, Siobhan M.. (2019). Corticomotor depression is associated with higher pain severity in the transition to sustained pain : A longitudinal exploratory study of individual differences. Journal of Pain. 20(12), pp. 1498-1506. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpain.2019.06.005
Test-retest reliability of homeostatic plasticity in the human primary motor cortex
Thapa, Tribikram and Schabrun, Siobhan M.. (2018). Test-retest reliability of homeostatic plasticity in the human primary motor cortex. Neural Plasticity. 2018, p. Article 6207508. https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/6207508
Movement does not promote recovery of motor output following acute experimental muscle pain
Schabrun, Siobhan M., Palsson, Thorvaldur S., Thapa, Tribikram and Graven-Nielsen, Thomas. (2018). Movement does not promote recovery of motor output following acute experimental muscle pain. Pain Medicine. 19(3), pp. 608-614. https://doi.org/10.1093/pm/pnx099
Disruption of cortical synaptic homeostasis in individuals with chronic low back pain
Thapa, Tribikram, Graven-Nielsen, Thomas, Chipchase, Lucinda S. and Schabrun, Siobhan M.. (2018). Disruption of cortical synaptic homeostasis in individuals with chronic low back pain. Clinical Neurophysiology. 129(5), pp. 1090-1096. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2018.01.060
The response of the primary motor cortex to neuromodulation is altered in chronic low back pain : A preliminary study
Schabrun, Siobhan M., Burns, Emma, Thapa, Tribikram and Hodges, Paul. (2018). The response of the primary motor cortex to neuromodulation is altered in chronic low back pain : A preliminary study. Pain Medicine. 19(6), pp. 1227-1236. https://doi.org/10.1093/pm/pnx168