Test-retest reliability of homeostatic plasticity in the human primary motor cortex

Journal article


Thapa, Tribikram and Schabrun, Siobhan M.. (2018). Test-retest reliability of homeostatic plasticity in the human primary motor cortex. Neural Plasticity. 2018, p. Article 6207508. https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/6207508
AuthorsThapa, Tribikram and Schabrun, Siobhan M.
Abstract

Homeostatic plasticity regulates synaptic activity by preventing uncontrolled increases (long-term potentiation) or decreases (long-term depression) in synaptic efficacy. Homeostatic plasticity can be induced and assessed in the human primary motor cortex (M1) using noninvasive brain stimulation. However, the reliability of this methodology has not been investigated. Here, we examined the test-retest reliability of homeostatic plasticity induced and assessed in M1 using noninvasive brain stimulation in ten, right-handed, healthy volunteers on days 0, 2, 7, and 14. Homeostatic plasticity was induced in the left M1 using two blocks of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) applied for 7 min and 5 min, separated by a 3 min interval. To assess homeostatic plasticity, 15 motor-evoked potentials to single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation were recorded at baseline, between the two blocks of anodal tDCS, and at 0 min, 10 min, and 20 min follow-up. Test-retest reliability was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Moderate-to-good test-retest reliability was observed for the M1 homeostatic plasticity response at all follow-up time points (0 min, 10 min, and 20 min, ICC range: 0.43–0.67) at intervals up to 2 weeks. The greatest reliability was observed when the homeostatic response was assessed at 10 min follow-up (). These data suggest that M1 homeostatic plasticity can be reliably induced and assessed in healthy individuals using two blocks of anodal tDCS at intervals of 48 hours, 7 days, and 2 weeks.

Year2018
JournalNeural Plasticity
Journal citation2018, p. Article 6207508
PublisherHindawi Limited
ISSN2090-5904
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/6207508
PubMed ID29983706
Scopus EID2-s2.0-85054998687
PubMed Central IDPMC6015686
Open accessPublished as ‘gold’ (paid) open access
Research or scholarlyResearch
Page range1-9
FunderNational Health and Medical Research Council
Publisher's version
License
File Access Level
Open
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online10 Jun 2018
Publication process dates
Accepted26 Apr 2018
Deposited19 Aug 2022
Grant ID1105040
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