The role of elite coaches’ expertise in identifying key constraints on long jump performance : How practice task designs can enhance athlete self-regulation in competition

Journal article


McCosker, Chris, Renshaw, Ian, Russell, Scott, Polman, Remco and Davids, Keith. (2021). The role of elite coaches’ expertise in identifying key constraints on long jump performance : How practice task designs can enhance athlete self-regulation in competition. Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health. 13(2), pp. 283-299. https://doi.org/10.1080/2159676X.2019.1687582
AuthorsMcCosker, Chris, Renshaw, Ian, Russell, Scott, Polman, Remco and Davids, Keith
Abstract

Understanding performance behaviours provides useful information for practitioners that can assist with the design of tasks to enhance the specificity of practice. In this study, the experiential knowledge of six elite long jump coaches was investigated using a constructivist grounded theory approach, with the aim of furthering our understanding of the competitive behaviours of elite long jump athletes and how they adapt actions to the emotional and physical demands of performance environments. Findings offer a coaches’ perspective on three performance contexts which shape athlete performance – perform, respond and manage – towards two common performance intentions (maximum jump and sub-maximal jump). We contend that these findings reflect how coaches perceive performance as a series of connected events (jumps), during which athlete intentionality facilitates self-regulatory strategies in the face of unique interactions between individual, task and environmental constraints across a competition. These findings highlight how individuals must continually co-adapt with constraints in performance environments supporting how athletes self-regulate using intentionality, emotions and cognitions. Practice task designs should, therefore, provide greater opportunities for athletes to learn to self-regulate in performance contexts, with opportunities to perform, respond and manage. Interpreting the coaches’ insights, we suggest that these major performance contexts of perform, respond and manage could, therefore, be strategically used to frame representative learning designs, providing a framework for better organisation of training tasks.

Keywordsexperiential knowledge; elite coaches; long jump; representative learning design; ecological dynamics; interacting constraints; grounded theory; affective learning design
Year2021
JournalQualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health
Journal citation13 (2), pp. 283-299
PublisherRoutledge
ISSN2159-676X
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1080/2159676X.2019.1687582
Scopus EID2-s2.0-85074868370
Open accessPublished as green open access
Page range283-299
Author's accepted manuscript
License
File Access Level
Open
Publisher's version
License
All rights reserved
File Access Level
Controlled
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online10 Nov 2019
Publication process dates
Accepted28 Oct 2019
Deposited24 Oct 2022
Permalink -

https://acuresearchbank.acu.edu.au/item/8y5zz/the-role-of-elite-coaches-expertise-in-identifying-key-constraints-on-long-jump-performance-how-practice-task-designs-can-enhance-athlete-self-regulation-in-competition

Download files


Author's accepted manuscript
AM_McCosker_2021_The_role_of_elite_coaches_expertise.pdf
License: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
File access level: Open

Restricted files

Publisher's version

  • 2
    total views
  • 1
    total downloads
  • 0
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month
These values are for the period from 19th October 2020, when this repository was created.

Export as

Related outputs

How performance analysis of elite long jumping can inform representative training design through identification of key constraints on competitive behaviours
McCosker, Chris, Renshaw, Ian, Greenwood, Daniel, Davids, Keith and Gosden, Edward. (2019). How performance analysis of elite long jumping can inform representative training design through identification of key constraints on competitive behaviours. European Journal of Sport Science. 19(7), pp. 913-921. https://doi.org/10.1080/17461391.2018.1564797