A systematic review of resting-state functional connectivity in obesity : Refining current neurobiological frameworks and methodological considerations moving forward

Journal article


Parsons, Nicholas, Steward, Trevor, Clohesy, Rebecca, Almgren, Hannes and Duehlmeyer, Leonie. (2022). A systematic review of resting-state functional connectivity in obesity : Refining current neurobiological frameworks and methodological considerations moving forward. Reviews in Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders. 23(4), pp. 861-879. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11154-021-09665-x
AuthorsParsons, Nicholas, Steward, Trevor, Clohesy, Rebecca, Almgren, Hannes and Duehlmeyer, Leonie
Abstract

Obesity is the second most common cause of preventable morbidity worldwide. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been used extensively to characterise altered communication between brain regions in individuals with obesity, though findings from this research have not yet been systematically evaluated within the context of prominent neurobiological frameworks. This systematic review aggregated resting-state fMRI findings in individuals with obesity and evaluated the contribution of these findings to current neurobiological models. Findings were considered in relation to a triadic model of problematic eating, outlining disrupted communication between reward, inhibitory, and homeostatic systems. We identified a pattern of consistently increased orbitofrontal and decreased insula cortex resting-state functional connectivity in individuals with obesity in comparison to healthy weight controls. BOLD signal amplitude was also increased in people with obesity across studies, predominantly confined to subcortical regions, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and putamen. We posit that altered orbitofrontal cortex connectivity may be indicative of a shift in the valuation of food-based rewards and that dysfunctional insula connectivity likely contributes to altered homeostatic signal processing. Homeostatic violation signals in obesity may be maintained despite satiety, thereby ‘hijacking’ the executive system and promoting further food intake. Moving forward, we provide a roadmap for more reliable resting-state and task-based functional connectivity experiments, which must be reconciled within a common framework if we are to uncover the interplay between psychological and biological factors within current theoretical frameworks.

Keywordsobesity; fMRI; functional connectivity; resting-state; systematic review; orbitofrontal cortex
Year2022
JournalReviews in Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders
Journal citation23 (4), pp. 861-879
PublisherSpringer
ISSN1389-9155
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1007/s11154-021-09665-x
PubMed ID34159504
Scopus EID2-s2.0-85134573469
Page range861-879
FunderDeakin University Postgraduate Research Scholarship (DUPRS)
Special Research Fund of Ghent University
Research Foundation Flanders (FWO)
National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)
Medical Research Future Fund (MRFF), Australian Government
BBRF Young Investigator Grant
University of Melbourne
Publisher's version
License
All rights reserved
File Access Level
Controlled
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online23 Jun 2021
Publication process dates
Accepted09 Jun 2021
Deposited30 Jun 2023
Grant IDBOF16/DOC/282
MRF1193736
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