“Nothing About Us Without Us” : Analyzing the Potential Contributions of Lived Experience to Penological Pedagogy

Journal article


Antojado, D.. (2023). “Nothing About Us Without Us” : Analyzing the Potential Contributions of Lived Experience to Penological Pedagogy. Journal of Criminal Justice Education. pp. 1-18. https://doi.org/10.1080/10511253.2023.2275101
AuthorsAntojado, D.
Abstract

This paper explores the necessity and considerations of integrating Lived Experience Criminology (LEC) into penological pedagogy. It critically analyses the underutilized, yet transformative, potential of lived experience of the CJS to enrich academic curricula and further inform student understanding, particularly in Australia. Drawing on initiatives such as the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program, Learning Together, and Walls to Bridges, the paper highlights how such programs operationalize LEC’s dimensions—particularly Persistent Experiential Narratives (PEN) and Common Experiential Narratives (CEN)—to build criminological knowledge. However, the need for cautious and ethical expansion of these programs is emphasized, considering potential objectification of people with lived experience of the CJS. The paper advocates for greater inclusion of lived experience perspectives in criminology curricula, underscoring the value they could bring to the preparation of future practitioners, the design of robust research, and the advancement of penological epistemology. Additionally, it stresses the importance of context, locality, and specialization within LEC, and the ethical considerations inherent to these pedagogical approaches. The paper concludes by calling for a stronger commitment from academia towards inclusion and empowerment of individuals with lived experience of the CJS, echoing the maxim “Nothing About Us Without Us” from the disability rights movement. The paper posits that significant strides in the CJS and academic discipline are achievable only through meaningful and sustained involvement of these individuals.

KeywordsLived experience; criminology; penological pedagogy; criminological curriculum; persistent experiential narrative; common experiential narrative
Year2023
JournalJournal of Criminal Justice Education
Journal citationpp. 1-18
PublisherTaylor & Francis
ISSN1745-9117
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1080/10511253.2023.2275101
Web address (URL)https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10511253.2023.2275101
Open accessPublished as non-open access
Research or scholarlyResearch
Page range1-18
Publisher's version
License
All rights reserved
File Access Level
Controlled
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online28 Oct 2023
Publication process dates
Accepted21 Oct 2023
Deposited10 Apr 2024
Additional information

© 2023 Academy of Criminal Justice sciences.

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