Refiguring Refugee Resistance and Vulnerabilities : Hazara Community Publishing in the Australian Resettlement Context

Journal article


Choi, Julie, Tomsic, Mary and Nguyen, Anh. (2023). Refiguring Refugee Resistance and Vulnerabilities : Hazara Community Publishing in the Australian Resettlement Context. Journal of Intercultural Studies. pp. 1-16. https://doi.org/10.1080/07256868.2023.2259816
AuthorsChoi, Julie, Tomsic, Mary and Nguyen, Anh
Abstract

This research focuses on intercultural negotiations and constructions of contemporary ethnic and cultural identity in a Western country of resettlement, through collaborative community publishing with Hazara people, a persecuted cultural and linguistic group. As a research team, primarily using interviews, we examined the multicultural children’s bookmaking project and the intercultural negotiations undertaken between 2018 and 2022 which led to the publication of an Afghanistani children’s story in three languages (English, Hazaragi and Dari) with artwork created by children. A crafted research narrative is used to present participants’ voices genuinely and respectfully as they generously engaged with our research process. We build upon Judith Butler’s analytical framework of linguistic vulnerability as the generative foundation of resistance to examine how linguistic precarity for Hazaragi speakers resettling in Australia is experienced. We found that community bookmaking and publishing involved complex processes of translation and transliteration where practical and political problems about cultural and linguistic authority were confronted. Engaging in this process of intercultural negotiation affords new possibilities for the resignification of recognisable and intelligible Hazara identities. We argue that a more liveable life for refugees in linguistically precarious resettlement contexts can be supported through culturally and linguistically responsive infrastructure that is respectful of their meaning making resources.

KeywordsIntercultural negotiations; Hazara culture and identity; Linguistic vulnerability; Political resistance; Hazara refugees; Multilingual publication
Year01 Jan 2023
JournalJournal of Intercultural Studies
Journal citationpp. 1-16
PublisherRoutledge
ISSN0725-6868
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1080/07256868.2023.2259816
Web address (URL)https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07256868.2023.2259816
Open accessOpen access
Research or scholarlyResearch
Page range1-16
Publisher's version
License
File Access Level
Open
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online27 Sep 2023
Publication process dates
Accepted12 Sep 2023
Deposited09 Jul 2024
Additional information

© 2023 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and is not altered, transformed, or built upon in any way. The terms on which this article has been published allow the posting of the Accepted Manuscript in a repository by the author(s) or with their consent.

Place of publicationAustralia
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https://acuresearchbank.acu.edu.au/item/90qv0/refiguring-refugee-resistance-and-vulnerabilities-hazara-community-publishing-in-the-australian-resettlement-context

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