From pawns to players: Rewriting three indigenous experiences of the British Empire

Book chapter


Fullagar, Kate 2015. From pawns to players: Rewriting three indigenous experiences of the British Empire. in: W. Jackson and E. J. Manktelow (ed.) Subverting empire: Deviance and disorder in the British colonial world United Kingdom: Palgrave Macmillan Ltd.. pp. 22 - 41
AuthorsFullagar, Kate
EditorsW. Jackson and E. J. Manktelow
Abstract

In the London summer of 1762, Lord Egremont, the Secretary of State in charge of Britain’s overseas colonies, welcomed the latest arrival of an indigenous diplomat to the imperial metropolis. The Cherokee warrior, Ostenaco, had travelled to London to meet King George III, ostensibly to seal a peace treaty just signed between the British and the Cherokee back in the Appalachians. Egremont was a gracious host and ensured that Ostenaco would, during his two-month stay, ‘want for nothing’.1 To the governor of Virginia who had arranged his trip, however, Egremont was less warm. ‘You rightly observe’, he wrote to Governor Fauquier, ‘that such visitors are always troublesome’.2

Keywordseighteenth century; restorative justice; home region; Manly Cove; walk away
Page range22 - 41
Year2015
Book titleSubverting empire: Deviance and disorder in the British colonial world
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan Ltd.
Place of publicationUnited Kingdom
SeriesCambridge Imperial and Post-Colonial Studies Series
ISBN9781137465870
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137465870_2
Research GroupInstitute for Humanities and Social Sciences
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https://acuresearchbank.acu.edu.au/item/8v274/from-pawns-to-players-rewriting-three-indigenous-experiences-of-the-british-empire

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