Myths of aerial tollhouses and their tradition from George the Monk to the Life of Basil the Younger

Journal article


Zecher, Jonathan. (2021). Myths of aerial tollhouses and their tradition from George the Monk to the Life of Basil the Younger. Dumbarton Oaks Papers. 75, pp. 297-318.
AuthorsZecher, Jonathan
Abstract

[Extract] In this article, I will offer explanations—rooted in monastic practice, social pressures, and literary taste—for why the tollhouse myth went from almost unknown to widely popular in the ninth and tenth centuries. I explore this rise primarily through George the Monk’s version of the tollhouses and the two patristic florilegia that he appends to his tale, though I will also discuss the Life of Basil the Younger. Scholars have long pointed to George as a witness to the tollhouse myth, and Marinis has noted, albeit briefly, the signal importance of George’s use of florilegium. He writes, “Unique for its time, George’s attempt to establish a narrative of the afterlife based on the collection of relevant sources heralds a mentality that would become prevalent from the eleventh century on.”21 George, I argue, testifies to transitions in both the conceptualization of the postmortem and anthology’s role in the articulation and legitimation of this myth.

Year2021
JournalDumbarton Oaks Papers
Journal citation75, pp. 297-318
PublisherDumbarton Oaks
ISSN0070-7546
PubMed Central IDhttps://www.jstor.org/stable/27107159
Research or scholarlyResearch
Page range22 pages
Publisher's version
License
All rights reserved
File Access Level
Controlled
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online2021
Publication process dates
Deposited31 May 2022
Permalink -

https://acuresearchbank.acu.edu.au/item/8xxv8/myths-of-aerial-tollhouses-and-their-tradition-from-george-the-monk-to-the-life-of-basil-the-younger

Restricted files

Publisher's version

  • 68
    total views
  • 0
    total downloads
  • 0
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month
These values are for the period from 19th October 2020, when this repository was created.

Export as

Related outputs

The Negotiation of Meaning in Late Antique Clinical Practice: Alexander of Tralles and “Natural Remedies”
Zecher, Jonathan. (2023). The Negotiation of Meaning in Late Antique Clinical Practice: Alexander of Tralles and “Natural Remedies”. In Disability, Medicine, and Healing Discourse in Early Christianity: New Conversations for Health Humanities pp. 84-101 Routledge.
Spiritual direction as a medical art in early Christian monasticism
Zecher, Jonathan L.. (2022). Spiritual direction as a medical art in early Christian monasticism Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780198854135.001.0001
Doctrine's Role in the Ascent to God according to John Climacus
Zecher, Jonathan. (2022). Doctrine's Role in the Ascent to God according to John Climacus. In Patristic Spirituality: Classical Perspectives on Ascent in the Journey to God pp. 355-375 Brill. https://doi.org/10.1163/9789004526983_021
Medical metaphors in byzantine spiritual direction
Zecher, Jonathan. (2022). Medical metaphors in byzantine spiritual direction. The Journal of Religion. 102(4), pp. 529-554. https://doi.org/10.1086/721356
Medical art in spiritual direction : Basil, Barsanuphios, and John on diagnosis and meaning in illness
Zecher, Jonathan. (2020). Medical art in spiritual direction : Basil, Barsanuphios, and John on diagnosis and meaning in illness. Journal of Early Christian Studies. 28(4), pp. 591-623. https://doi.org/10.1353/earl.2020.0044
The reception of evagrian psychology in the Ladder of Divine Ascent: John Cassian and Gregory Nazianzen as sources and conversation partners
Zecher, Jonathan. (2018). The reception of evagrian psychology in the Ladder of Divine Ascent: John Cassian and Gregory Nazianzen as sources and conversation partners. Journal of Theological Studies. 69(2), pp. 674 - 713. https://doi.org/10.1093/jts/fly125
The role of death in the ladder of divine ascent and the Greek Ascetic tradition
Zecher, Jonathan. In A. Louth and G. Clark (Ed.). (2015). The role of death in the ladder of divine ascent and the Greek Ascetic tradition Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198724940.001.0001
Antony's vision of death? Athanasius of Alexandria, Palladius of Heenopolis, and Egyptian Mortuary Religion
Zecher, Jonathan. (2014). Antony's vision of death? Athanasius of Alexandria, Palladius of Heenopolis, and Egyptian Mortuary Religion. Journal of Late Antiquity. 7(1), pp. 159 - 176. https://doi.org/10.1353/jla.2014.0016
The angelic life in desert and ladder: John Climacus's re-formulation of Ascetic Spirituality
Zecher, Jonathan. (2013). The angelic life in desert and ladder: John Climacus's re-formulation of Ascetic Spirituality. Journal of Early Christian Studies. 21(1), pp. 111 - 136. https://doi.org/10.1353/earl.2013.0006
Death among the desert fathers: Evagrius and theophilus in the sayings tradition
Zecher, Jonathan. (2013). Death among the desert fathers: Evagrius and theophilus in the sayings tradition. Sobornost Incorporating Eastern Churches Review. 35(2017-02-01), pp. 148 - 169.
Death's spiralling narrative: On 'reading' the Orthodox funeral
Zecher, Jonathan. (2011). Death's spiralling narrative: On 'reading' the Orthodox funeral. Studia Liturgica. 41(2), pp. 274 - 292.