Creatine supplementation : can it improve quality of life in the elderly without associated resistance training?

Journal article


Moon, Anna, Heywood, Lara, Rutherford, Stephen and Cobbold, Christian. (2013). Creatine supplementation : can it improve quality of life in the elderly without associated resistance training? Current Aging Science. 6(3), pp. 251-257. https://doi.org/10.2174/1874609806666131204153102
AuthorsMoon, Anna, Heywood, Lara, Rutherford, Stephen and Cobbold, Christian
Abstract

Introduction: Ageing is associated with decreased muscle mass, strength, power and function, and reduction in bone density and mineral content, leading to reduced independence and increased risk of falls. Creatine supplementation is reported to improve muscular strength and performance with training in younger athletes, and therefore could benefit older individuals.

Aims: This review critically appraises the current literature on whether creatine supplementation enhances muscular performance and function, body composition, bone mineral density and content in older adults without the addition of resistance training, and thus determines whether creatine supplementation can lead to an improved lifestyle for the sedentary elderly population.

Results: There is conflicting evidence regarding the usefulness of creatine supplementation in older subjects. Generally, however, creatine supplementation, without associated resistance training, seems to enhance muscular strength, power and endurance, increase lean body mass (LBM) and improve the functional capacity of the elderly. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that increased muscle mass due to creatine supplementation can result in increased local bone density. It appears that the effect of creatine supplementation is more beneficial in larger muscles and less effective in smaller muscles, however there are exceptions. The mechanism by which creatine supplementation works requires further research, however it is likely that the effects of creatine are related to creatine kinase activity, providing enhanced energy production for greater muscular contraction.

Conclusions: These data indicate that creatine supplementation without associated training in the elderly could potentially delay atrophy of muscle mass, improve endurance and strength, and increase bone strength, and thus may be a safe therapeutic strategy to help decrease loss in functional performance of everyday tasks.

KeywordsAgeing; creatine; elderly; supplementation; muscle; strength ; functional performance
Year01 Jan 2013
JournalCurrent Aging Science
Journal citation6 (3), pp. 251-257
PublisherBentham Science Publishers
ISSN1874-6128
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.2174/1874609806666131204153102
Web address (URL)https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24304199/
Open accessPublished as non-open access
Research or scholarlyResearch
Page range251-257
Publisher's version
License
All rights reserved
File Access Level
Controlled
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online2013
Publication process dates
Accepted27 Nov 2013
Deposited16 May 2024
Additional information

© 2013 Bentham Science Publishers

Place of publicationUnited Arab Emirates
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