Strengthening interventions increase strength and improve activity after stroke: a systematic review

Journal article


Ada, Louise, Dorsch, Simone Lise and Canning, Colleen G.. (2006) Strengthening interventions increase strength and improve activity after stroke: a systematic review. Australian Journal of Physiotherapy. 52(4), pp. 241 - 248. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0004-9514(06)70003-4
AuthorsAda, Louise, Dorsch, Simone Lise and Canning, Colleen G.
Abstract

Question: Is strength training after stroke effective (ie, does it increase strength), is it harmful (ie, does it increase spasticity), and is it worthwhile (ie, does it improve activity)? Design: Systematic review with meta-analysis of randomised trials. Participants: Stroke participants were categorised as (i) acute, very weak, (ii) acute, weak, (iii) chronic, very weak, or (iv) chronic, weak. Intervention: Strengthening interventions were defined as interventions that involved attempts at repetitive, effortful muscle contractions and included biofeedback, electrical stimulation, muscle re-education, progressive resistance exercise, and mental practice. Outcome measures: Strength was measured as continuous measures of force or torque or ordinal measures such as manual muscle tests. Spasticity was measured using the modified Ashworth Scale, a custom made scale, or the Pendulum Test. Activity was measured directly, eg, 10-m Walk Test, or the Box and Block Test, or with scales that measured dependence such as the Barthel Index. Results: 21 trials were identified and 15 had data that could be included in a meta-analysis. Effect sizes were calculated as standardised mean differences since various muscles were studied and different outcome measures were used. Across all stroke participants, strengthening interventions had a small positive effect on both strength (SMD 0.33, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.54) and activity (SMD 0.32, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.53). There was very little effect on spasticity (SMD –0.13, 95% CI –0.75 to 0.50). Conclusion: Strengthening interventions increase strength, improve activity, and do not increase spasticity. These findings suggest that strengthening programs should be part of rehabilitation after stroke.

Keywordscerebrovascular accident; physical therapy techniques; exercise therapy; rehabilitation; review systematic; meta-analysis; randomized controlled trials; muscle weakness; muscle spasticity; systematic review of function
Year2006
JournalAustralian Journal of Physiotherapy
Journal citation52 (4), pp. 241 - 248
PublisherAustralian Physiotherapy Association
ISSN0004-9514
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1016/S0004-9514(06)70003-4
Page range241 - 248
Research GroupSchool of Allied Health
Place of publicationAustralia
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