Severe obesity and diabetes self-care attitudes, behaviours and burden: Implications for weight management from a matched case-controlled study. Results from Diabetes MILES-Australia

Journal article


Dixon, John, Browne, Jessica, Mosely, Kylie, Rice, Toni, Jones, Kay, Pouwer, Frans and Speight, Jane. (2014) Severe obesity and diabetes self-care attitudes, behaviours and burden: Implications for weight management from a matched case-controlled study. Results from Diabetes MILES-Australia. Diabetic Medicine. 31(2), pp. 232 - 240. https://doi.org/10.1111/dme.12306
AuthorsDixon, John, Browne, Jessica, Mosely, Kylie, Rice, Toni, Jones, Kay, Pouwer, Frans and Speight, Jane
Abstract

Aims: To investigate whether diabetes self‐care attitudes, behaviours and perceived burden, particularly related to weight management, diet and physical activity, differ between adults with Type 2 diabetes who are severely obese and matched non‐severely obese control subjects.

Methods: The 1795 respondents to the Diabetes MILES—Australia national survey had Type 2 diabetes and reported height and weight data, enabling BMI calculation: 530 (30%) were severely obese (BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2; median BMI = 41.6 kg/m2) and these were matched with 530 control subjects (BMI < 35 kg/m2; median BMI = 28.2 kg/m2). Diabetes self‐care behaviours, attitudes and burden were measured with the Diabetes Self‐Care Inventory—Revised. Within‐group and between‐group trends were examined.

Results: The group with BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2 was less likely to achieve healthy diet and exercise targets, placed less importance on diet and exercise recommendations, and found the burden of diet and exercise recommendations to be greater than the group with BMI < 35 kg/m2. The group with BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2 was more likely to be actively trying to lose weight, but found weight control a greater burden. These issues accentuated with increasing obesity and were greatest in those with BMI > 45 kg/m2. There were no between‐group differences in other aspects of diabetes self‐care: self‐monitoring of blood glucose, use of medications and smoking. Moderate‐to‐severe symptoms of depression were independently associated with reduced likelihood of healthy diet and physical activity, and with greater burden associated with diet, physical activity and weight management.

Conclusions: Severely obese people with diabetes demonstrated self‐care attitudes, behaviours and burdens that infer barriers to weight loss. However, other important diabetes self‐care behaviours are supported equally by severely obese and non‐severely obese individuals.

Year2014
JournalDiabetic Medicine
Journal citation31 (2), pp. 232 - 240
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
ISSN0742-3071
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1111/dme.12306
Scopus EID2-s2.0-84892491305
Page range232 - 240
Research GroupSchool of Philosophy
Place of publicationUnited Kingdom
Permalink -

https://acuresearchbank.acu.edu.au/item/86163/severe-obesity-and-diabetes-self-care-attitudes-behaviours-and-burden-implications-for-weight-management-from-a-matched-case-controlled-study-results-from-diabetes-miles-australia

  • 8
    total views
  • 0
    total downloads
  • 0
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month
These values are for the period from 19th October 2020, when this repository was created.

Export as

Related outputs

Mindfulness-based interventions for adults who are overweight or obese : A meta-analysis of physical and psychological health outcomes
Rogers, Jeffrey M., Ferrari, Madeleine, Mosely, Kylie, Lang, Cathryne P. and Brennan, Leah. (2017) Mindfulness-based interventions for adults who are overweight or obese : A meta-analysis of physical and psychological health outcomes. Obesity Reviews. 18(1), pp. 51-67. https://doi.org/10.1111/obr.12461
'I'm not a druggie, I'm just a diabetic' : A qualitative study of stigma from the perspective of adults with type 1 diabetes
Browne, Jessica, Ventura, Adriana, Mosely, Kylie and Speight, Jane. (2014) 'I'm not a druggie, I'm just a diabetic' : A qualitative study of stigma from the perspective of adults with type 1 diabetes. BMJ Open. 4(7), pp. 1 - 10. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005625
Social stigma in diabetes: A framework to understand a growing problem for an increasing epidemic
Schabert, Jasmin, Browne, Jessica L., Mosely, Kylie and Speight, Jane. (2013) Social stigma in diabetes: A framework to understand a growing problem for an increasing epidemic. Patient. 6(1), pp. 1 - 10. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40271-012-0001-0
'I call it the blame and shame disease' : a qualitative study about perceptions of social stigma surrounding type 2 diabetes
Browne, Jessica, Ventura, Adriana, Mosely, Kylie and Speight, Jane. (2013) 'I call it the blame and shame disease' : a qualitative study about perceptions of social stigma surrounding type 2 diabetes. BMJ Open. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003384
Building resilience in young people through meaningful participation
Mosely, Kylie, Collin, Pippa, Burns, Jane and Nicholas, Jonathon. (2006) Building resilience in young people through meaningful participation. Advances in Mental Health. 5(1), pp. 34 - 40.