Mapping an Australian Occupational Therapy curriculum: Linking intended learning outcomes with entry-level competency standards

Journal article


Ben Sellar, Carolyn M. Murray, Mandy Stanley, Hugh Stewart, Helene Hipp and Susan Gilbert-Hunt. (2018). Mapping an Australian Occupational Therapy curriculum: Linking intended learning outcomes with entry-level competency standards. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal. 65(1), pp. 35-44. https://doi.org/10.1111/1440-1630.12430
AuthorsBen Sellar, Carolyn M. Murray, Mandy Stanley, Hugh Stewart, Helene Hipp and Susan Gilbert-Hunt
Abstract

Background
Curriculum mapping involves systematic charting of programme content against professional competencies. This process can reveal strengths, gaps and redundancies within educational programmes.

Methods
Curriculum mapping occurred using intended learning (ILOs) as documented in individual courses and linking them to units and elements within the occupational therapy minimum competency standards (ACSOT) and Miller's Framework of competency. Five occupational therapy academics and two impartial research assistants identified links between ILOs and units and elements of the ACSOT. Analysis of each course in the curriculum was completed by two reviewers. A systematic protocol was developed that enabled a transparent process and resolution of discrepancies between reviewers.

Results
There were many links (47% of total) between the documented curriculum and ACSOT Unit 1 Professional attitudes and behaviours. The other six units of the ACSOT had between 5% (Unit 7) and 16% links (Unit 3). No links were made between ILOs and the elements of evaluation (4.4), cessation (3.7) and quality assurance of services (7.3). Difficulties mapping ILOs to units and elements revealed inconsistencies in specificity and language in the ILOs and also ambiguities and gaps within the standards themselves. Mapping against Miller's framework showed a steady increase in performance expectations of students across the four years levels.

Conclusion
Curriculum mapping is recommended for critical reflection about content of occupational therapy programmes and to review pedagogical approaches. This process revealed strengths and weaknesses of the occupational therapy curriculum being mapped but also revealed insight into the current ACSOT that may inform future iterations.

Keywordscompetence; education; graduate; practice; professional
Year2018
JournalAustralian Occupational Therapy Journal
Journal citation65 (1), pp. 35-44
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
ISSN0045-0766
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1111/1440-1630.12430
Scopus EID2-s2.0-85033217055
Publisher's version
File Access Level
Controlled
Publication process dates
Deposited12 May 2021
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