Remembering and fighting for their own: Vietnam veterans and the Long Tan Cross

Journal article


Cramer, Lorinda and Witcomb, Andrea. (2018) Remembering and fighting for their own: Vietnam veterans and the Long Tan Cross. Australian Historical Studies. 49(1), pp. 83 - 102. https://doi.org/10.1080/1031461X.2017.1394887
AuthorsCramer, Lorinda and Witcomb, Andrea
Abstract

On the third anniversary of the Battle of Long Tan on 18 August 1969, a simple but distinctive concrete cross was planted on the site of the battle to remember the eighteen Australian lives lost. The memorial cross was later toppled, lost and recovered but its physical form was never forgotten. In Australia, veterans made it a focus for their commemoration of all who served and died in the Vietnam War, replicating it across the country. This article analyses the complex motivations behind this process, revealing the Long Tan cross as a deeply personal symbol for Vietnam veterans and part of their fight for recognition in the aftermath of the war.

Year2018
JournalAustralian Historical Studies
Journal citation49 (1), pp. 83 - 102
PublisherRoutledge
ISSN1031-461X
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1080/1031461X.2017.1394887
Scopus EID2-s2.0-85042412403
Page range83 - 102
Research GroupSchool of Arts
Publisher's version
File Access Level
Controlled
Place of publicationAustralia
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https://acuresearchbank.acu.edu.au/item/88qq4/remembering-and-fighting-for-their-own-vietnam-veterans-and-the-long-tan-cross

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