Implications of Cardio-Respiratory Fitness on the Performance of Exercise Tests

Journal article


Michael Jelinek and Kenneth Hossack. (2019) Implications of Cardio-Respiratory Fitness on the Performance of Exercise Tests. Heart Lung and Circulation. 28(4), pp. 64-66. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hlc.2018.07.015
AuthorsMichael Jelinek and Kenneth Hossack
Abstract

In 2016, the American Heart Association (AHA) produced a position paper on cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) which defined CRF as the most important cardiac risk factor in the assessment of prognosis in a wide variety of clinical states [1]. The aim of the paper was to improve patient management and to encourage life-style based strategies designed to improve cardiovascular risk. The authors showed that:

• Cardiorespiratory fitness was a stronger predictor of patient survival than other clinical and exercise test variables in both men and women.

• Non-exercise cardiac risk factors clustered in unfit people.

• People unable to exercise to five METs were at the highest risk of premature mortality. (1 MET = 3.5ml/kg/minute of oxygen intake).

• Improvement in CRF from the least fit to intermediate CRF reduced the mortality risk more than an increase in CRF from the intermediate CRF group to the high CFR group.

• They showed that adding a measure of CRF to baseline risk factors better predicted mortality in a wide variety of subjects with various clinical presentations.

• That adding measures of CRF to prediction models, particularly those based on the Framingham Risk Score, improved estimations of risk of cardiovascular disease.

• That CRF can be reasonably well predicted from a standardised questionnaire.

In this Brief Communication, we expand on how CRF can be assessed and reported in exercise testing.

Keywordsfitness; aerobic capacity; exercise tests; fitness questionnaires
Year2019
JournalHeart Lung and Circulation
Journal citation28 (4), pp. 64-66
PublisherElsevier Australia
ISSN1443-9506
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hlc.2018.07.015
Scopus EID2-s2.0-85054022753
Publisher's version
File Access Level
Controlled
Publication process dates
Deposited03 May 2021
Permalink -

https://acuresearchbank.acu.edu.au/item/8vz34/implications-of-cardio-respiratory-fitness-on-the-performance-of-exercise-tests

Restricted files

Publisher's version

  • 0
    total views
  • 0
    total downloads
  • 0
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month
These values are for the period from 19th October 2020, when this repository was created.

Export as

Related outputs

Coaching Patients Saves Lives and Money
Joshua Byrnes, Thomas Elliott, Margarite Vale, Michael Jelinek and Paul Scuffham. (2018) Coaching Patients Saves Lives and Money. American Journal of Medicine. 131(4), pp. 415-422. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjmed.2017.10.019
Risk factors for incident heart failure with preserved or reduced ejection fraction, and valvular heart failure, in a community-based cohort
Gong, Fei Fei, Jelinek, Michael, Castro, Julian M., Coller, Jennifer M., McGrady, Michele, Boffa, Umberto, Shiel, Louise, Liew, Danny, Wolfe, R., Stewart, Simon, Owen, Alice J., Krum, Henry, Reid, Christopher, Prior, David and Campbell, Duncan J.. (2018) Risk factors for incident heart failure with preserved or reduced ejection fraction, and valvular heart failure, in a community-based cohort. Open Heart. 5(2), pp. 1 - 11. https://doi.org/10.1136/openhrt-2018-000782
SMARTphone-based, early cardiac REHABilitation in patients with acute coronary syndromes [SMART-REHAB Trial]: A randomized controlled trial protocol
Yudi, Matias B., Clark, David J., Tsang, David, Jelinek, Michael, Kalten, Katie, Joshi, Subodh, Phan, Khoa, Nasis, Arthur, Amerena, John, Arunothayaraj, Sandeep, Reid, Chris and Farouque, Omar. (2016) SMARTphone-based, early cardiac REHABilitation in patients with acute coronary syndromes [SMART-REHAB Trial]: A randomized controlled trial protocol. BMC Cardiovascular Disorders. 16(170), pp. 1 - 8. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12872-016-0356-6
Improving access and equity in reducing cardiovascular risk : The Queensland Health Model
Ski, Chantal, Vale, Margarite, Bennett, Gary, Chalmers, Victoria, McFarlane, Kim, Jelinek, Michael, Scott, Ian and Thompson, David. (2015) Improving access and equity in reducing cardiovascular risk : The Queensland Health Model. Medical Journal of Australia. 202(3), pp. 148 - 152. https://doi.org/10.5694/mja14.00575
Reversing social disadvantage in secondary prevention of coronary heart disease
Jelinek, Michael, Santamaria, John, Best, James, Thompson, David R., Tonkin, Andrew and Vale, Margarite. (2014) Reversing social disadvantage in secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. International Journal of Cardiology. 171(3), pp. 346 - 350. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2013.12.022
'FIT FOR PURPOSE'. The COACH program improves lifestyle and biomedical cardiac risk factors
Jelinek, Michael, Santamaria, John, Thompson, David and Vale, Margarite. (2012) 'FIT FOR PURPOSE'. The COACH program improves lifestyle and biomedical cardiac risk factors. Heart. 98(21), pp. 1608 - 1608. https://doi.org/10.1136/heartjnl-2012-302723
Reconciling systematic reviews of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation and secondary prevention programmes for coronary heart disease
Jelinek, Michael, Clark, Alexander, Oldridge, Neil, Briffa, Thomas and Thompson, David Robert. (2011) Reconciling systematic reviews of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation and secondary prevention programmes for coronary heart disease. European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation. 18(2), pp. 147 - 149. https://doi.org/10.1177/1741826710389388
Screening for depression in coronary heart disease: The perfect Hegelian dialectic? A short commentary on ''Beyond the blues: The need for integrated care pathways''
Jelinek, Michael. (2011) Screening for depression in coronary heart disease: The perfect Hegelian dialectic? A short commentary on ''Beyond the blues: The need for integrated care pathways''. European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation. 18(2), pp. 222 - 223. https://doi.org/10.1177/1741826710389411