Introduction : The uses of Irish-Australian literature

Journal article


McDonald, Ronan and Nolan, Marguerite. (2021). Introduction : The uses of Irish-Australian literature. Australian Literary Studies. 36(2), pp. 1-11. https://doi.org/10.20314/als.3eb21c884e
AuthorsMcDonald, Ronan and Nolan, Marguerite
Abstract

In a famous – perhaps too famous – proclamation, the late historian Patrick O’Farrell (1933–2003) declared that the ‘distinctive Australian identity was not born in the bush, nor at Anzac Cove: these were merely situations for its expression. No; it was born in Irishness protesting against the extremes of Englishness’ (O’Farrell 12). There has been a tradition of thinking about the Irish in Australia as the grit in the oyster, a recalcitrant internal other that allows Australia to emerge as a national pearl distinct from Britain. Yet, arguably, the separatism-assimilation binary, and the presumptions about nation-building upon which it is built, has not received sufficient critical treatment in recent decades as theories of diaspora, settler colonialism and cultural encounter have developed. Historiography about the Irish in Australia, over which O’Farrell’s presence still dominates, has ebbed in recent years as the attention has turned to Indigenous histories and to the waves of migration that have occurred since the Second World War.[1] The fractious yet formative role of the Irish presence has tended to be papered over by terms like ‘Anglo-Celtic’ or ‘British’ Australia. Indeed, if Noel Ignatieff told the story of ‘how the Irish became white’ in the United States, perhaps in Australia the equivalent narrative is ‘how the Irish became British’, an identification which, as Elizabeth Malcolm recently pointed out, is remarkably ill-fitting: ‘Catholic Irish people do not usually consider themselves British and nor do most British people think of the Irish as British either. Australian usage of the category “British” to include the Catholic Irish is unusual’ (Malcolm 201).

Year2021
JournalAustralian Literary Studies
Journal citation36 (2), pp. 1-11
PublisherUniversity of Queensland Press
ISSN1837-6479
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.20314/als.3eb21c884e
Research or scholarlyResearch
Page range1-11
Publisher's version
License
All rights reserved
File Access Level
Controlled
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online30 Sep 2021
Publication process dates
Deposited03 Jun 2022
Permalink -

https://acuresearchbank.acu.edu.au/item/8xy05/introduction-the-uses-of-irish-australian-literature

Restricted files

Publisher's version

  • 88
    total views
  • 0
    total downloads
  • 3
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month
These values are for the period from 19th October 2020, when this repository was created.

Export as

Related outputs

Cathy Freeman, reconciliation and the burden of history
Nolan, Maggie. (2022). Cathy Freeman, reconciliation and the burden of history. Continuum: Journal of Media and Cultural Studies. 36(3), pp. 429-447. https://doi.org/10.1080/10304312.2021.1998371
Reading fiction, talking reconciliation : Australian book clubs, book talk and the politics of history
Nolan, Marguerite Rose, Clarke, Robert and Brown, Rebekah. (2021). Reading fiction, talking reconciliation : Australian book clubs, book talk and the politics of history. In In Moser, Doris and Dürr, Claudia (Ed.). Über bücher reden : Literaturrezeption in lesegemeinschaften pp. 231-242 V&R unipress. https://doi.org/10.14220/9783737013239.231
Conceptualising Irish-Aboriginal writing
Nolan, Maggie. (2021). Conceptualising Irish-Aboriginal writing. Australian Literary Studies. 36(2), pp. 1-20. https://doi.org/10.20314/als.776fd12cac
Shifting timescapes and the significance of the Mine in Alexis Wright's Carpentaria
Nolan, Maggie. (2020). Shifting timescapes and the significance of the Mine in Alexis Wright's Carpentaria. Australian Literary Studies. 35(2), pp. 1-21. https://doi.org/10.20314/als.5910cfb010
Reading massacre : Book club responses to landscape of farewell
Nolan, Maggie. (2020). Reading massacre : Book club responses to landscape of farewell. Texas Studies in Literature and Language. 62(1), pp. 73-96. https://doi.org/10.7560/TSLL62104
An Australian ethics of reading?
Nolan, Maggie. (2020). An Australian ethics of reading? In In Gildersleeve, Jessica (Ed.). The routledge companion to Australian literature pp. 171-178 Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781003124160
Reading groups and reconciliation : Kate Grenville's The Secret River and the ordinary reader
Nolan, Marguerite and Clarke, Robert. (2014). Reading groups and reconciliation : Kate Grenville's The Secret River and the ordinary reader. Australian Literary Studies. 29(4), pp. 19 - 35.
XVII New literatures
Carpentier, Sally, Chakraborty, Mridula Nath, Daymond, Margaret, Holden, Philip, McNeill, Dougal, Nolan, Marguerite Rose, Raja, Ira, Rampaul, Giselle, Sharrad, Paul, Da Silva, Tony Simoes, Skeete, Geraldine and Whitehouse, Ian. (2014). XVII New literatures. Year's Work in English Studies. 93(1), pp. 1046 - 1212. https://doi.org/10.1093/ywes/mau015
Book clubs and reconciliation : A pilot study on book clubs reading the 'fictions of reconciliation'
Clarke, Robert and Nolan, Marguerite. (2014). Book clubs and reconciliation : A pilot study on book clubs reading the 'fictions of reconciliation'. Australian Humanities Review.
Reading The Secret River
Nolan, Marguerite and Clarke, Robert. (2011). Reading The Secret River. Journal of Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies. 17(2), pp. 9 - 25.
Who's a weird mob? Imagining assimilation in postwar Australia
Nolan, Marguerite Rose. (2009). Who's a weird mob? Imagining assimilation in postwar Australia. In In R. Summo-O'Connell (Ed.). Imagined Australia: Reflections around the reciprocal construction of identity between Australia and Europe pp. 265 - 276 Peter Lang Publishing.
Canvassing the issues: Indigenous Australians in higher education
Frawley, Jack, Nolan, Marguerite Rose and White, Nereda Dawn. (2009). Canvassing the issues: Indigenous Australians in higher education. In In J. Frawley, M. Nolan and N. White (Ed.). Indigenous Issues in Australian Universities: Research, Teaching, Support pp. 1 - 6 Charles Darwin University Press.
The demidenko affair and Australian hoaxes
Nolan, Marguerite Rose. (2007). The demidenko affair and Australian hoaxes. In In N. Birns and R. Birns (Ed.). A Companion to Australia Literature Since 1900 pp. 127 - 138 Camden House.
Bitin back: Indigenous writing in QLD
Nolan, Marguerite Rose. (2007). Bitin back: Indigenous writing in QLD. In In P. Buckridge and B. McKay (Ed.). By the Book: A Literary History of Queensland pp. 259 - 277 University of Queensland Press.
Elizabeth Durack, Eddie Burrup and the art of identification
Nolan, Marguerite Rose. (2004). Elizabeth Durack, Eddie Burrup and the art of identification. In In P. Knight and J. Long (Ed.). Fakes and Forgeries pp. 135 - 145 Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
Dynamics of displacement: Doing postgraduate Australian studies in the UK
Nolan, Marguerite Rose. (2004). Dynamics of displacement: Doing postgraduate Australian studies in the UK. In In D. Carter, K. Darian-Smith and G. Worby (Ed.). Thinking Australian Studies pp. 224 - 234 University of Queensland Press.
Displacing indigenous Australians: Freud’s totem and taboo
Nolan, Marguerite Rose. (2003). Displacing indigenous Australians: Freud’s totem and taboo. In In J. Damousi and R. Reynolds (Ed.). History on the Couch: Essays in History and Psychoanalysis pp. 60 - 72 Melbourne University Press.
Identity crises and orphaned rewritings
Nolan, Marguerite Rose. (2003). Identity crises and orphaned rewritings. In In A. Oboe (Ed.). Mongrel Signatures: Reflections on the Work of Mudrooroo pp. 107 - 128 Rodopi.