Young carers and educational engagement : Quantitative analysis of bursary applications in Australia

Journal article


Moore, Tim, Bourke-Taylor, Helen M., Greenland, Natalie, McDougall, Stewart, Robinson, Luke, Brown, Ted and Bromfield, Leah. (2022). Young carers and educational engagement : Quantitative analysis of bursary applications in Australia. Health and Social Care in the Community. 30(5), pp. 1625-1638. https://doi.org/10.1111/hsc.13589
AuthorsMoore, Tim, Bourke-Taylor, Helen M., Greenland, Natalie, McDougall, Stewart, Robinson, Luke, Brown, Ted and Bromfield, Leah
Abstract

Young carers support family members affected by disability or a health condition. The Young Carer Bursary Program aims to support young carers' education. This paper analysed data from consenting bursary applicants (2017–2019) to investigate relationships between wellbeing, educational attendance, home study and other factors. Descriptive statistics, correlation and regression analysis determined significant issues, relationships and influential factors related to young carer (N = 1,443) wellbeing and education. Sixty-eight percent were aged between 13 and 18 years and attended secondary school. One third of the sample reported that they were the main carer in their family and 29% reported receiving no support. Female applicants from single parent households who were the main carer attended educational settings less often. Eighteen percent (n = 267) rated their wellbeing as poor/very poor. Better wellbeing was associated with increased educational attendance (rs = 0.33, p < 0.001) and home study (rs = 0.34, p < 0.001). Wellbeing was associated with main carer status, caring for a parent, having a disability, being older and having few supports. Educational attendance was associated with main carer status, higher care load and fewer supports. Home study was associated with having a disability, caring for a sibling, caring for more than 11 hr per week and having fewer supports. Important factors about the age, life situation and challenges experienced by young carers identified in this paper indicate that further research into preferred supports and effectiveness of the bursary in improving educational engagement is warranted.

Keywordscaregiving; disability; education; families; social supports; young carers
Year2022
JournalHealth and Social Care in the Community
Journal citation30 (5), pp. 1625-1638
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN0966-0410
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1111/hsc.13589
PubMed ID34657333
Scopus EID2-s2.0-85117125931
Page range1625-1638
FunderCarers Australia
Publisher's version
License
All rights reserved
File Access Level
Controlled
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Online17 Oct 2021
Publication process dates
Accepted20 Sep 2021
Deposited28 Apr 2023
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