Children’s art : Histories and cultural meanings of creative expression by displaced children

Book chapter


Tomsic, Mary. (2019). Children’s art : Histories and cultural meanings of creative expression by displaced children. In In Moruzi, Kristine, Musgrove, Nell and Pascoe Leahy, Carla (Ed.). Children's voices from the past : New historical and interdisciplinary perspectives pp. 137-158 Palgrave Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-11896-9_6
AuthorsTomsic, Mary
EditorsMoruzi, Kristine, Musgrove, Nell and Pascoe Leahy, Carla
Abstract

[Excerpt] Artwork by displaced children has been created and mobilised in a range of contexts, which include legal realms, therapeutic settings, in humanitarian work and publications, art exhibitions, news reports and political activism. In different historical moments, we have examples of displaced children’s drawings being preserved. From the examples retained, and others with records about them, we gain access to some of the variety of interpretations attached to these drawings and forms of creative expression. Over time and in various places, children’s creative expression has served multiple purposes and has been understood as art, documentary evidence of experience, instruments for fundraising, teaching materials for adults and children, as well as techniques of therapeutic practice for individual children.

consider some of the meanings invested in these drawings and the ways in which historians can use these materials. Following this, drawings by and about children held in immigration detention by the Australian government will be analysed to examine the ways these children have communicated personal and political concerns. The ways these concerns have been understood and responded to will also be examined.

Page range137-158
Year2019
Book titleChildren's voices from the past : New historical and interdisciplinary perspectives
PublisherPalgrave Publishing
Place of publicationCham, Switzerland
ISSN9783030118952
9783030118969
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-11896-9_6
Publisher's version
License
All rights reserved
File Access Level
Controlled
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
Print08 May 2019
Publication process dates
Deposited30 Sep 2021
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