Self-compassion is associated with optimum self-care behaviour, medical outcomes and psychological wellbeing in a cross-sectional sample of adults with diabetes

Journal article


Ferrari, Madeleine, Cin, Michelle D. and Steele, Mike. (2017) Self-compassion is associated with optimum self-care behaviour, medical outcomes and psychological wellbeing in a cross-sectional sample of adults with diabetes. Diabetic Medicine. 34(11), pp. 1546 - 1553. https://doi.org/10.1111/dme.13451
AuthorsFerrari, Madeleine, Cin, Michelle D. and Steele, Mike
Abstract

Aim To investigate the role of self-compassion in diabetes outcomes. Self-compassion is a construct which may be relevant to chronic conditions, given its focus on compassion toward oneself, especially in times of difficulty. Methods In this cross-sectional study we collected data online from 310 adults diagnosed with diabetes. The questionnaire measured three primary outcomes: self-management behaviours; HbA1c levels and psychological wellbeing. Potential predictors were also assessed, including self-compassion, locus of control, social support and demographics. Results Multiple regression analyses showed that self-compassion had the most consistent association with better outcomes, including all forms of self-management behaviour, HbA1c levels and psychological well-being. Selfcompassion was independently associated with 55.1% of the variance in well-being. Internal locus of control was also significantly associated with better well-being and HbA1c outcomes. Chance and external locus of control and social support were generally associated with poorer outcomes. Conclusions Higher levels of self-compassion are typically associated with improved self-management behaviour, medical outcomes and psychological well-being in adults with diabetes mellitus. The present findings suggest that selfcompassion may be a parsimonious and suitable intervention target. Future interventions and consultations with medical professionals may benefit from fostering self-compassion in adults with diabetes mellitus.

Year2017
JournalDiabetic Medicine
Journal citation34 (11), pp. 1546 - 1553
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Inc.
ISSN1464-5491
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1111/dme.13451
Page range1546 - 1553
Research GroupSchool of Philosophy
Publisher's version
File Access Level
Controlled
Place of publicationUnited Kingdom
EditorsR. I. G
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