Language agents reduce the risk of existential catastrophe

Journal article


Goldstein, Simon and Kirk-Giannini, Cameron Domenico. (2023). Language agents reduce the risk of existential catastrophe. AI & Society. pp. 1-11. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00146-023-01748-4
AuthorsGoldstein, Simon and Kirk-Giannini, Cameron Domenico
Abstract

Recent advances in natural-language processing have given rise to a new kind of AI architecture: the language agent. By repeatedly calling an LLM to perform a variety of cognitive tasks, language agents are able to function autonomously to pursue goals specified in natural language and stored in a human-readable format. Because of their architecture, language agents exhibit behavior that is predictable according to the laws of folk psychology: they function as though they have desires and beliefs, and then make and update plans to pursue their desires given their beliefs. We argue that the rise of language agents significantly reduces the probability of an existential catastrophe due to loss of control over an AGI. This is because the probability of such an existential catastrophe is proportional to the difficulty of aligning AGI systems, and language agents significantly reduce that difficulty. In particular, language agents help to resolve three important issues related to aligning AIs: reward misspecification, goal misgeneralization, and uninterpretability.

Keywordslanguage agents; existential risk; reward misspecification; goal misgeneralization; interpretable AI
Year2023
JournalAI & Society
Journal citationpp. 1-11
PublisherSpringer
ISSN0951-5666
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1007/s00146-023-01748-4
Scopus EID2-s2.0-85168370049
Page range1-11
FunderThe Center for AI Safety
Publisher's version
License
All rights reserved
File Access Level
Controlled
Output statusIn press
Publication dates
Online19 Aug 2023
Publication process dates
Accepted03 Aug 2023
Deposited08 Nov 2023
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