Mighty knowledge

Journal article


Beddor, Bob and Goldstein, Simon. (2021). Mighty knowledge. Journal of Philosophy. 118(5), pp. 229-269. https://doi.org/10.5840/jphil2021118518
AuthorsBeddor, Bob and Goldstein, Simon
Abstract

We often claim to know what might be—or probably is—the case. Modal knowledge along these lines creates a puzzle for information-sensitive semantics for epistemic modals. This paper develops a solution. We start with the idea that knowledge requires safe belief: a belief amounts to knowledge only if it could not easily have been held falsely. We then develop an interpretation of the modal operator in safety (could have) that allows it to non-trivially embed information-sensitive contents. The resulting theory avoids various paradoxes that arise from other accounts of modal knowledge. It also delivers plausible predictions about modal Gettier cases.

Year2021
JournalJournal of Philosophy
Journal citation118 (5), pp. 229-269
PublisherJournal of Philosophy, Inc.
ISSN1939-8549
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.5840/jphil2021118518
Research or scholarlyResearch
Page range229-269
Author's accepted manuscript
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All rights reserved
File Access Level
Open
Publisher's version
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All rights reserved
File Access Level
Controlled
Output statusPublished
Publication dates
PrintMay 2021
Publication process dates
Deposited19 Oct 2021
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